New York, baby.

(I know this is not a food picture, but it’s still great!)

New York, baby.

(I know this is not a food picture, but it’s still great!)

Malaysian Red Curry

Malaysian Red Curry

Green Morning Smoothie
- almonds - milk - banana- oatmeal- fresh spinach leaves- honey
- can add protein powder, spirulina, chia or basil seeds to your liking :)

Green Morning Smoothie

- almonds
- milk
- banana
- oatmeal
- fresh spinach leaves
- honey

- can add protein powder, spirulina, chia or basil seeds to your liking :)

@ Berceau des Sens, EHL’s gastronomical restaurant once again! 

I am so honoured to be a student of not only “the best hotel school in Switzerland”, but also a student working alongside extremely talented individuals, namely, the acclaimed chefs of the BDS restaurant. These individuals joined my school as faculty members in 2012 and teach first year students in the ‘preparatory year’ (practical knowledge in rooms and F&B). Since my first year was in 2011, I did not have the opportunity to work with these chefs. Without further adieu, I would like to briefly introduce…

Christophe Pacheco: The Executive Chef of BDS restaurant. He received the Meilleur Ouvrier de France award in 2011 (an award for being the best craftsman of his trade) and has worked with Joel Robuchon amongst many other famous chefs. He has a one-Michelin star restaurant near Paris, called Les Armes de France.

Audrey Gellet: She is the pastry chef, who is known for winning the competition, Qui sera le prochain grand pâtissier? on France television. She has worked alongside famous chef Anne-Sophie Pic and is the author of a pastry cookbook. I am so lucky to be able to eat her desserts from our school’s cafeteria offer as well. 

Franck Michel: The Executive Chef of BDS. He won the Meilleur Ouvrier de France award in 2004 for pâtisserie and is the world champion for pâtisserie in 2006. 

On to the food…

~ Menu Découverte “discovery menu” 5-course tasting menu ~

The mise en bouche (not pictured above) was a small serving of creamy soup accompanied by white fish tartare -> I didn’t catch what the waitress said. 

1st course - Escargot

The appetiser - deep-fried escargot in breadcrumbs (top left) - was cooked to perfection at a golden brown colour. When I sliced it open, the juice bursted out. It was really rich in flavour, dark brown and quite heavy in oil. I don’t know how they cooked it, but I’m guessing that the escargot was frozen together with the fatty juice in a sphere mold, and right before deep-frying it was rolled in fine breadcrumbs.

2nd course - Sea Bass

Next, was the sea-bass fillet (top right). In between two layers of fish was some shellfish (i.e. mussels), and served with fava bean purée. The fish was extremely tender. I’m guessing it was gently steamed (low temperature).

3rd course - Beef Wellington 

I loved how the portions were small. The beef wellington was gently rolled up along with small pieces of foie gras. It was served with sautéed mushrooms and green vegetable purée.

Amuse bouche (palate cleanser) - berry sorbet with vanilla cream 

I thought this was the final dessert, but it turned out to be a “pre-dessert”. Personally, it would have been better without the cream because the menu is already quite filling.

4th course - Strawberry tart with basil sorbet

First time trying basil sorbet and it tasted really good. I think it was a mix of pear and basil.

#tbt #bofinger #paris

#tbt #bofinger #paris

First time in Edinburgh, Scotland

When I think of Scotland now, all I think of are three thing: Haggis, deep-fried mars bar and cold.

Deep-fried mars bar: To be honest, I wasn’t expecting much from the food. I had some friends tell me to try the infamous deep-fried mars bars from Edinburgh, which I did and paid a few pounds for. I was amused by all the deep-fried things other than mars bars at the shop. Wait, let’s rewind a bit…so in order to buy a deep-fried mars bar, well, you first have to buy a mars bar by yourself at a convenience store, then go to a “chips” shop that will deep fry it for you. These chip shops sell EVERYTHING DEEP-FRIED; deep-fried sandwiches, deep-fried hot dogs, deep-fried tarts…you name it. I wonder where this idea came from…I mean, everything is cooked and then deep-fried again, which doesn’t make any sense, unless you actually want to pack on the extra calories. Anyways, I had to try it, so I did and only took one tiny bite. A deep-fried mars bar is very heavy. I suggest eating it with vanilla ice-cream if you do try it, just so there is something to “freshen” it up (not that it makes it any healthier). 

Haggis: This was the first time trying haggis and I tried it as an appetiser, although, usually it comes as a main dish. It’s a very hearty typical British comfort food. It’s made of all parts of a sheep (lungs, heart, organs, etc.), mixed with savoury seasoning and oatmeal and finally cooked in sheep’s stomach. It’s served with mashed potatoes and gravy. I had expected worse, but after trying it, I was not that horrified of the taste. My friend who lives and studies in Edinburgh told me that no one really likes eating haggis (except for the locals); even she finds it distasteful. There was a strong meaty flavour; that lamb flavour that many people dislike. In addition, heat from tons of black pepper and a gooey texture from the cooked oatmeal. It is definitely a dish that takes a while to get used to. Being Chinese probably made it easier for me to handle this taste compared to others. They also sell haggis in cans at touristy shops…

Other food: Sadly, I have to make an “other food” section because I didn’t find any other food as interesting as deep-fried mars bars and haggis. I noticed a lot of sandwich bars and Asian fast food restaurants; unfortunately, neither are very healthy. 

So what else did I experience in Edinburgh?

  • Lovely landscape and hiking trails (my friend and I walked Arthur’s Seat; an extinct volcano)
  • Amazing architecture; I love the huge buildings and wide pavements
  • The people are incredibly friendly 
  • Local beer at Brewdog
  • and some shopping -> lambswool and cashmere scarves which Edinburgh is well-known for

Oh, and I was super lucky to see sunshine while I was there for four days :)

Dim Sum “Touch the Heart”
點心 or Dim Sum literally means “touch the heart” in English. It characterises a social gathering in which friends and family come together to enjoy a delightful meal. 點心 is eaten at a restaurant because it’s not so easy to prepare at home. You can consider this a brunch or lunch meal where a variety of meat and veggie dishes (and desserts!) are steamed in small bamboo baskets. Each basket usually comes with three to four dumplings (if the dish is dumplings), so for a large table, you would order two items of each in order for everyone to get a fair share.
I love how you can enjoy so many dishes at one time. One of my favourite dishes is the one illustrated in the large picture above. It’s a rice noodle roll with marinated minced beef or 腸粉. It is usually made with either beef or shrimp, and a sweet soy sauce is poured over it. Rice noodle rolls can be found in various cuisines, including Vietnamese and Thai food. 

Dim Sum “Touch the Heart”

點心 or Dim Sum literally means “touch the heart” in English. It characterises a social gathering in which friends and family come together to enjoy a delightful meal. 點心 is eaten at a restaurant because it’s not so easy to prepare at home. You can consider this a brunch or lunch meal where a variety of meat and veggie dishes (and desserts!) are steamed in small bamboo baskets. Each basket usually comes with three to four dumplings (if the dish is dumplings), so for a large table, you would order two items of each in order for everyone to get a fair share.

I love how you can enjoy so many dishes at one time. One of my favourite dishes is the one illustrated in the large picture above. It’s a rice noodle roll with marinated minced beef or 腸粉. It is usually made with either beef or shrimp, and a sweet soy sauce is poured over it. Rice noodle rolls can be found in various cuisines, including Vietnamese and Thai food. 

DIY Strawberry & Basil Seed Jam (and cardamom)

Ingredients:

  • fresh strawberries (or over ripe)
  • honey (I did not use sugar)
  • basil or chia seeds (basil seeds are very similar to chia seeds and have all sorts of health benefits)
  • cardamom powder or other spice (cinnamon, chilli, nutmeg or vanilla seeds -> this depends on your taste. It’s not necessary to add spices; it just turns an ordinary strawberry jam into something new!)
    Add a little bit in order not to override the natural flavour of the strawberries

Steps:

  1. Wash and dry the strawberries with a paper towel
  2. Slice each strawberry in quarters
  3. Place them into a small pot and let it boil
    You can cook the strawberries for a longer/shorter time depending on what texture you like. Personally, I like jam with bits of fruit so I stopped the cooking process before the strawberries broke down too much
  4. Right before turning off the fire, add a few spoons of honey
  5. Lastly, add some basil or chia seeds into the mixture while it’s off the fire. Allow the mixture to cool down. While this happens, the seeds will form a jelly-like texture which is a natural chemical reaction when basil or chia seeds are exposed to moisture
  6. When the mixture is cooled down, place it into a jar - I just used a recycled jar
  7. Keep it in the fridge and enjoy!

21 in Paris [Part 2]

Flea Market shopping: the most entertaining shopping experience. You can find nice jewellery, vintage designer goods (that may or may not be real), wine glasses, toys, paintings, sculptures, books, music, etc. 

At Le Train Bleu restaurant in Paris. I loved the interior. The atmosphere felt like a place where only the elite could dine back then. It was so grand. 

Cooking equipment store in Paris - Mora

They have loads and loads of professional kitchen hardware. It’s like a stationery store but for food! 

21 in Paris [Part 1]

My weekend in Paris in a nutshell:

  • I turned 21 with two of my best friends and my mother
  • Saw all the monuments (Notre Dame, Arc de Triomphe, the Louvre…and many more.)
  • Took macaron cooking lessons
  • Ate macarons by La Seine (the river that flows through the city)
  • Walked along Champs-Elysée and Saint Honoré
  • Discovered Parisien nightlife 
  • Ate a lot…and that’s what this blog is all about, so let’s get started! 

~

After my birthday dinner, we decided to take photos in front of the Eiffel Tower. That meant taking off all our coats in the freezing cold and in drizzling rain.

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Ladurée shop display of a raspberry & gold leaf macaron tower.

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At the famous Maille mustard shop. I discovered so many blends of mustards (curry, fig, coconut, mango, raspberry, etc.)!

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Shopping in Paris…

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At Bofinger - the seafood was excellent and so fresh!

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Cooking lessons with La Cuisine Paris.

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Shopping in the food market…

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Buffalo tomatoes

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We decided to stay in for a night and cook with fresh ingredients from the market.

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Take Me Back To Morocco - This is my most favourite photograph that I took in Morocco one year ago. 
(at a tannery in Fez)

Take Me Back To Morocco - This is my most favourite photograph that I took in Morocco one year ago. 

(at a tannery in Fez)

When in college…random ingredients.

When in college…random ingredients.

Hong Kong street snacks made at home.

Missing mom’s cooking… As one of my last meals at home, I requested Oyakodon from my mom. N I just learned from wiki that Oyakodon means parent-child dish…

Missing mom’s cooking… As one of my last meals at home, I requested Oyakodon from my mom. N I just learned from wiki that Oyakodon means parent-child dish…

Throwback to the days I interned at Four Seasons Hong Kong.
I was so fortunate to work with great Chefs…each of whom is uniquely skilled in what they do. Through hands-on work and observation, I was able to learn so much about the techniques in making pastries and desserts, Chinese cuisine and French cuisine. These Chefs are artists. 
It’s important to mention the food revolution happening through social media (Instagram, Facebook and Pinterest), which creates awareness about food (the ingredients, processes, origin) and also makes young people appreciate food even more so today than a decade ago.

Throwback to the days I interned at Four Seasons Hong Kong.

I was so fortunate to work with great Chefs…each of whom is uniquely skilled in what they do. Through hands-on work and observation, I was able to learn so much about the techniques in making pastries and desserts, Chinese cuisine and French cuisine. These Chefs are artists.

It’s important to mention the food revolution happening through social media (Instagram, Facebook and Pinterest), which creates awareness about food (the ingredients, processes, origin) and also makes young people appreciate food even more so today than a decade ago.

(Source: shiumai-eats)

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